11/15/08

Obama Jews to McCain Jews: You lost AND you are bigots

The articles this week (Jewish Week, Jewish Standard) about bigoted comments said by children in Orthodox day schools and about the superficial reactions to them in the community are exercises in truly tasteless journalism and gossip mongering.

To our esteemed and liberal journalists may I remind you that when you win you don't seek to humiliate or embarrass the loser. That's something you learn when you play team sports in grade school.

And to our allegedly bigoted schools, as long as the subject has been opened, there are indeed a couple of more urgent and persistent probing questions to ask about day schools and race. In the aftermath of these articles about the hurried and superficial responses by the schools to the offhanded remarks by young students, I'd really like to know,
  • How many black teachers have the day schools hired in the past ten years?
  • How many black (Jewish) students attend the schools?
  • How many lessons have been taught in class about multiculturalism?
  • How many Martin Luther King Day events have been held?
Once we have the answers we need to see some serious debate on the issue of latent racism in the Jewish Day School movement and in the Orthodox community at large.

Finally I'd like to read some award-worthy stories in our Jewish journals about new, creative and sustained action in the works to confront these problems head-on.

[See this as my letter to the editor in the Jewish Week and Jewish Standard.]

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

This is hardly surprising coming from a group whose doctrine is basically built upon separation and exclusion from everything that is NOT deemed Jewish.

Imagine if every group in this country lived life like the Orthodox? Would it be at all possible to obtain the ideals that this great nation strives for?

With all due respect, I think not. We would be completely segregated, across the board, in all aspects of life- schools, camps, restaurants, relationships, etc.

Why is this somehow socially "OK" when religion is interjected into the picture?