8/5/10

Times' Editors and columnist Tom Friedman Support the Ground Zero Mosque

In his quirky mode, the Times' Tom Friedman supports the so-called Ground Zero Mosque by saying he likes Broadway. You gotta read the opinion to see if you follow the logic. We share his viewpoint that it is a core American value to allow this project to go forward.

Those who oppose it have expressed a host of ugly intolerant, bigoted, racist sentiments.

Really. Imagine if people started saying we need to be sensitive to the victims of Bernard Madoff's crimes. He is Jewish. Hence we must close down the Wall Street Synagogue because it is so close to the ground zero of Madoff's misdeeds. Utter nonsense. But then so is the argument that we need to shut off the Mosque project because 9/11 terrorists were Muslim and we need to be sensitive to the victims of that crime.

We understand the human propensity to tar all members of a group with the crimes of a few. And we consider it barbaric at best. We also understand the power of symbolism. No, this project is not a triumphalist symbol of the victory and spread of Islam. And yes, it is a vital symbol of the virtues and strengths of freedom and democracy. The Times' editors call it a "Monument to Tolerance."

Here is the link to Friedman's quirky op-ed.

2 comments:

Richard said...

I agree with Friedman that Muslims should be allowed to build an Islamic center in NY. But by the same token, Jews should be allowed to worship and/or visit the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The same liberal press that is crying for freedom of worship here should not back Islamic bigotry in the Middle East in the name of "sensitivity". This should be a two way street.

Observer said...

Would feel better if Imam Rauf would send back some funding he said he received from the Perdana Foundation in Malaysia. This is money from a fund headed by former Prime Minister Mahathir bin Mohamad, an open anti-Semite and racist (see his "Malay Dilemma'). He attacked me as "an American Zionist" when I wrote about him years ago (he had an hidden interest in a Kuala Lumpur office building which he did not deny).